Sonoran Pronghorn and Yuma Clapper Rail both to be featured. Yuma clapper rails are one of 3 races of fed-erally endangered western clapper rail popu-lations. References References 1 Abarca, F. J. Ingraldi, M. J. Varela-Romero, A. Home range The Yuma clapper rail has been classified as endangered since 1967, when it was listed under the Endangered Species Preservation Act, a forerunner to the Endangered Species Act. The Yuma clapper rail has been sighted along the Colorado River where Nevada, Arizona, and California meet, south to Yuma, Arizona, and into Mexico. In the cattail marshes of the delta lived the Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis), a chicken-sized bird for which the security of the cattails provided places to rest, hunt, and raise their young. The Yuma Clapper Rail occurs primarily along the lower Colorado River and in the area of the Salton Sea in southeastern California. The plant, which has never been operated, was built in 1992 to desalinate the irrigation return flows that now run to the wetland. Geclée prints are of the highest quality on heavy, acid free, archival watercolor paper, shipped flat to avoid damage to surface pigments. The Yuma clapper rail was listed as endangered in 1976 under the Endangered Species Preservation Act, based on its precariously small population size in the U.S. and the threats to the new marsh habitat from channelization and dredging of the river in Arizona and California. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Modifying it to “Yuma Ridgway’s Rail” seems awkward, but could work. Yuma Clapper Rail. While the status of the Yuma clapper rail has improved since it first gained federal protection in 1967, with several hundred individuals counted in the U.S. annually and several thousand more at Santa Clara, full recovery is not yet in hand. Although the rail population appears to be stable, its future is tied to the various water projects along the Colorado River. 236. Starting in 2010, the plant was run for 11 months as a test, and may in the future be operated full-time. A close relative of the Clapper Rail of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, and was considered part of the same species until recently. The Yuma clapper rail is an endangered subspecies of seven North American clapper rails generally found in freshwater marshes. Yuma clapper rails range from northern California along the Pacific coast to central Mexico and have been sighted along the Colorado River where … Continue reading "Yuma Clapper Rail" Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of the Draft Yuma Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) Recovery Plan, First Revision under the Endangered Species. All prints are personally signed in These two areas came to support the pioneering birds from Mexico, and now serve as core habitat areas for the rare birds. August 2013; Wetlands 33(4) DOI: 10.1007/s13157-013-0425-x. The Yuma clapper rail is found in the lower Colorado River watershed and the Salton Sea, inhabiting freshwater and brackish water wetlands (Anderson and Ohmart 1985). International discussions are ongoing to identify a solution that would provide adequate water for the wetland. The key to maintaining or expanding the rail population is maintaining early growth stages of cattail marsh by creating shallow water areas that serve as nesting places for this species. Watercolor painting, signed and dated archival giclée print on white watercolor paper. and bitterns), including the federally endangered Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis). The Yuma clapper rail was listed as endangered on March 11, 1967 pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1966. In addition, very little of the marshes in the delta in Mexico remained by the mid-1960s, with just a few irrigation drains and ponded areas remaining in cattail habitat. Its wetland habitat on the Lower Colorado River in Arizona and Mexico is threatened by pollution, urbanization, damming, diversion and desiccation. The Yuma Clapper Rail is a federally endangered bird that breeds in emergent marshes within the lower Colorado River basin in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. The Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) is a federally endangered species and 90% of the U.S. population exists in only 2 wetlands. Something similar could be done with levipes (SE), formerly called “Light-footed Clapper Rail.” But how about our local obsoletus, formerly called “California Clapper Rail?” One wouldn’t want to call it “California Ridgway (formerly Clapper) Rail… The Yuma clapper rail was listed as endangered in 1976 under the Endangered Species Preservation Act, based on its precariously small population size in the U.S. and the threats to the new marsh habitat from channelization and dredging of the river in Arizona and California. Most of the water of the Colorado River no longer reached the delta, but was instead taken from the River by diversions to water the new, large agricultural fields in Arizona, California, and Mexico. Also known as the Yuma Clapper Rail Photo by Courtney Conway, USGS The Department of Interior abruptly changed its assessment regarding the threat posed to the endangered Yuma Ridgway's rail (also called the Yuma Clapper rail ) by industrial-scale solar projects, clea Yuma Clapper Rail Interior riparian deciduous forests and woodlands: sycamore, cottonwood, willow, ash, walnut, bigtooth maple, hackberry, cypress, juniper, oak Common Black-Hawk* Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet* Yellow Warbler* Sonoran riparian deciduous forest and woodlands: primarily cottonwood, willow, mesquite, tamarisk At the Santa Clara Wetland, the 100,000-acre (40-ha) feet of irrigation return flows from the U.S. are at risk from operation of the Bureau of Reclamation's Yuma Desalting Plant. Lesley Fitzpatrick, a biologist in the Service's Arizona Ecological Services Field Office, can be reached at lesley_fitzpatrick@fws.gov or 602-242-0210, ext. The 21st Century brought three important conservation plans. The pond is a favorite nesting spot for the endangered Yuma clapper rail. Multi-Species Call-Broadcast Improved Detection of Endangered Yuma Clapper Rail Compared to Single-Species Call-Broadcast. Though weighing a mere 10 ounces, the clapper rail can grow up to 14.5 inches long and sport a 19-inch wingspan. In general, western clapper rails range from northern California along the Pacific coast to central Mexico. Fortunately, the changes to the River in the U.S. allowed new cattail marshes to form behind diversion dams and secondary channels. The species currently inhabits the mainstem Colorado River in Arizona, California, and Nevada; the Virgin Staff at the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge and the Wister IWA are working to re-establish suitable marsh habitat through controlled burns and earthwork to re-shape and contour some units. The first Yuma clapper rail in the U.S. was found in 1902 near Bard, California; other individuals were collected nearby in Yuma, Arizona in 1921. The Yuma clapper rail was listed as endangered in 1976 under the Endangered Species Preservation Act, based on its precariously small population size in the U.S. and the threats to the new marsh habitat from channelization and dredging of the river in Arizona and California. Without the delta marshes to support them, Yuma clapper rails began to spread north and west. The Yuma clapper rail, which ranges up and down the Colorado River from Mexico to Utah, was listed as Endangered in 1967 under the Endangered Species Preservation Act, a federal law that was a precursor to the 1973 Endangered Species Act. U.S.FWS Species profile about species listing status, federal register publications, recovery, critical habitat, conservation planning, petitions, and life history. 1993, Observations on the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis), and shorebird communities in the Cienega de Santa Clara, Sonora, Mexico, Arizona Game and Fish Department, Phoenix, AZ California originally listed the Yuma clapper rail as endangered in 1971; re-listed it as rare in 1978, and currently lists it as threatened. Historically, the river corridor in the U.S. did not support the extensive areas of cattail marshes needed by the Yuma clapper rail. With the completion of the Hoover Dam in 1935, the chain of water development that dried up most of the delta's marshes was virtually complete. The List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants (List) is found … The first phase of the Managed Marsh project was completed in 2009, and the second phase will begin construction in 2014, with the remaining acreage completed by 2019. A single, larger population of the endangered Yuma clapper rail Rallus longirostris yumanensis was used for comparison. We compared a protocol that uses call-broadcast for only one species (Yuma clapper rail [Rallus longirostris yumanensis]) to a protocol that uses call-broadcast for multiple species. The Yuma clapper rail is the largest rail found along the lower Colorado River. The Yuma clapper rail is an endangered subspecies of seven North American clapper rails generally found in freshwater marshes. They feed on crayfish, small fish, clams, isopods, and a variety of insects. Through the late 1800s, the Colorado River flowed unimpeded from the Rocky Mountains south through the Grand Canyon to its delta on the Gulf of California in Mexico. The plan calls for the creation of 512 acres (207 hectares) of cattail marsh along the river for clapper rail habitat. The species' recovery plan identifies protection and management of habitats as crucial for the survival and recovery of the species. The Yuma race is unique among North American clapper rail subspecies because it uses freshwater marshes. The progress made in the last decade must be carried forward in the next to achieve recovery of this secretive resident of the cattail marsh. The Yuma clapper rail, a small cattail-dwelling marsh bird, is a bellwether for the health of desert waterways. The 255-acre (103-ha) Hart Mine Marsh, on the U.S. First, the Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program, a joint state and federal program, addresses the effects of water diversions and Colorado River management programs to the clapper rail and 26 other southwestern species. Photo Credit: Gregg Garnett, USBR-LCR MSCP. Along the Colorado River, a number of national wildlife refuges supported cattail marshes, as did the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Imperial Wildlife Area-Wister Unit (IWA) at the Salton Sea. Protected in 1967 by the Endangered Species Act, this shy water bird nests in freshwater marshes along the Colorado and Gila rivers in Arizona and the Salton Sea in California. The Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan has also helped to dramatically improve the fortunes of the clapper rail and other rare species. Populations also occur The bird probably winters in Mexico. The U.S. FWS's Threatened & Endangered Species System track information about listed species in the United States. As a by-product of efforts to reduce salinity of the Colorado River water diverted for agriculture in Mexico in the 1970s, the Bureau of Reclamation began diverting saline agricultural return flows to the then nearly dry Santa Clara Wetland. The endangered Yuma Clapper Rail can be spot nesting in the freshwater pond area encircled by the Michael Hardenberger Trail. The Department of Interior abruptly changed its assessment regarding the threat posed to the endangered Yuma Ridgway's rail (also called the Yuma Clapper rail) by industrial-scale solar projects, clearing the way for First Solar to build the Sunshine Valley Solar project next to one of the bird's few remaining strongholds. Of the known U.S. breed-ing population (about 700 individuals), 90% ex-ists in … The Yuma clapper rail is a marsh bird found in dense cattail or cattail-bulrush marshes along the lower Colorado River in Mexico north to the lower Muddy River and Virgin River in Utah above those rivers’ confluence with Lake Mead. Legal Status. How Are Lesser Long-Nosed Bat, Black-Capped Vireo, Yuma Clapper Rail, Pima Pineapple Cactus, Gypsum Wild-Buckwheat, Mesa Verde Cactus, and Zuni Fleabane Currently Listed? Construction of water control structures at Hart Mine Marsh on Cibola National Wildlife Refuge. Listed as endangered in the United States in 1967, the rail's U.S. population was estimated at 698 birds in 1973. Within a few years, the water created a large marsh complex that not only supported clapper rails, but millions of other migratory waterfowl and shorebirds. Back to Plants and Animals of the Colorado River Basin, Plants and Animals of the Colorado River Basin. Environmental Conservation Online System (ECOS), Information, Planning and Conservation System (IPaC), Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances, Recovery Online Activity Reporting System (ROAR), Endangered Species Regulations and Policies, Nearing the Finish Line: Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel Recovery, Big Bend's Namesake Fish Saved from Extinction, Recovering the Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander: A Little Amphibian with a Large Fan-base, The Yuma Clapper Rail: A Marsh Bird in the Desert. However, multi-species monitoring using call-broadcast may reduce these benefits if birds are reluctant to call once they hear broadcasted calls of other species. The second plan is being undertaken by the Imperial Irrigation District at and around the southern end of the Salton Sea, as part of the Quantification Settlement Agreement Water Transfers. Yuma clapper rails range from northern California along the Pacific coast to central Mexico and have been sighted along the Colorado River where Nevada, Arizona, and California meet. Yuma Ridgway's Rail. This endangered rail can only be found in parts of Arizona and California along rivers and tributaries. They feed on crayfish, small fish, clams, isopods, and a variety of insects. It was listed as an endangered species in the United States on March 11, 1967 (32 FR 4001). Over the next 40 years, Yuma clapper rails were found more and more frequently on the Colorado River in Arizona and California. It is thought that the Yuma clapper rail was not distributed along the Colorado River until suitable habitat was created through dam construction. Active management is needed on existing marshes at Salton Sea and along the Colorado River to maintain high-quality habitat for these birds. The document submitted for review is the first revision of the recovery plan for the Yuma clapper rail. To ensure the survival of this species in the U.S., conservation partners must continue to maintain the three primary habitat areas, and gain a better understanding of the use of those habitats and dispersal and movements of clapper rails between them. This 76-foot by 22-foot mural in Yuma honors the Sonoran pronghorn and the Yuma clapper rail, a marsh bird, is the twentieth in a series commissioned by the Center for Biological Diversity. We evaluated whether prescribed fire could be used as a surrogate The "Yuma" Clapper Rail inhabits freshwater marsh along the lower Colorado River and nearby areas. Protected since 1967 as an endangered species, the Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) is a bellwether for the health of desert waterways. These measures will provide a total of 618 acres (250 ha) of cattail marsh and open water to benefit the clapper rail. Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Fish and Wildlife Service's Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, is the first created habitat under the program, which also contains a $25 million habitat maintenance fund designed to support maintenance activities on existing marsh habitats along the river. In southern California, marshes around the Salton Sea also expanded and became available. The Yuma clapper rail is the only clapper rail to inhabit freshwater. A survey conducted in 1969 and 1970 estimated about 700 breeding birds in the Unit… The California black rail (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus) is federally endangered in Mexico, is state threatened or endangered in California California Black Rails (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus) are state endangered in Arizona and state threatened in California. The Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostrisyumanensis) is a federally endangered species that occurs in wetlands in Arizona, Nevada, and southern California. Cattail marsh at Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge showing quality Yuma clapper rail habitat. Ninety percent of the U.S. population exists in only 2 wetland complexes. A survey conducted in 1969 and 1970 estimated about 700 breeding birds in the United States. The Yuma Clapper Rail is one of three subspecies of clapper rails in California, all of whom have been listed as endangered by State and Federal Government. Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Yuma Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) Recovery Plan, First Revision, 6697-6698 [2010-2921] The plan calls for the conservation of 697 acres (282 ha) of marsh and open water habitats at the northern end of the Salton Sea. While prospects for the Yuma clapper rail have improved with these new habitats, the species continues to face a number of challenges. Available in small and large size.